News

NFL Annual Meeting canceled, rules changes vote put off until May

Commissioner Roger Goodell announced today that after "careful consideration and consultation with medical experts," the NFL has canceled the March 29-April 1, Annual Meeting due to the COVID-19 virus pandemic. Instead, the league will conduct its business at the NFL Spring Meeting, scheduled for May 19-20. This means that the NFL Competition Committee will not consider rules changes until after the start of the officiating new year on May 15. The NFL officials are still in the "dark period." The collective bargaining agreement between the NFL and its game officials states that the league will not communicate with the officials from the end

2020 rules proposals

7 rules changes proposed by NFL teams for 2020

Embed from Getty Images   The NFL released the teams’ proposals for rules changes that will be up for consideration at the annual league meeting March 29-April 1 in Palm Beach, Fla. The rules changes proposed by the Competition Committee have not yet been released. A brief summary of each is listed below, indicating the team that proposed it. Two proposals, jointly submitted by Baltimore and the Los Angeles Chargers, suggest increasing the manpower of the officiating crew, by proposing an eighth official similar to the SkyJudge of the former Alliance of American Football, as well as a senior technology advisor to the

#NFL100

NFL100: When John McDonough called The Longest Game on Christmas Day

It's always hard for officials to be away from home on a special holiday. So it was for referee John McDonough and his officiating crew, scheduled to work the Christmas Day divisional playoff game between the Kansas City Chiefs and the visiting Miami Dolphins. McDonough, who officiated Super Bowl IV, and was a AFL and NFL referee from 1960 to 1973, lead a veteran crew that included umpire Frank Sinkovitz, head linesman Leo Miles, line judge Bill Swanson, field judge Bob Baur and back judge Adrian Burk.  The NFL had never scheduled a postseason game on Christmas. A few years before the

Mechanics

Working the official? Putting a bug in their ear? What exactly was Kyle Shanahan doing?

In this week's Inside the NFL on Showtime, 49ers head coach Kyle Shanahan can be seen and heard doing what's known as "working the official," that is, alerting the official to potential things an opposing team is doing or might do that is a violation of the rules. This can lead many fans and players alike to proclaim that a given official is in the tank for a given team or coach. That is not the case. Before each game at all levels, the officials will meet with the coaches of both teams. The purpose is to: Make sure all players are

Getting back on the horse: officials must focus on recovering from a bad game

Every official in every sport from the peanut league to the pros has had that moment. They come off the field to boos from the fans, glares from coaches, and dour faces from their supervisors. The official or crew has had a bad game. Whether it was one bad call in a big moment or the official or their crew didn't have it that night, it is an awful feeling. Officials are used to having fans, coaches and talking heads say they had a terrible game and made terrible calls -- that happens every week and game film almost always exonerates

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