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CallsLive blog: Texans at Ravens

Live blog: Texans at Ravens

AFC Divisional Playoff

We will be live blogging the calls and rules interpretations from the Texans-Ravens game.

If you have any questions or comments, use the comments section of this post, or tweet us @footballzebras.

Pete Morelli is the referee. Full crew list is at the bottom of the post.

  • R — #135 Pete Morelli (15th year, 9th as referee)
  • U — #71 Ruben Fowler (6th year)
  • HL — #26 Mark Baltz (23rd year)
  • LJ — #18 Byron Boston (17th year)*
  • FJ — #89 Jon Lucivansky (3rd year)
  • SJ — #95 James Coleman (7th year)*
  • BJ — #75 Rob Vernatchi (8th year)
  • Alternates — Paul King (#121, U from Terry McAuley’s crew), Barry Anderson (#20, FJ from Jeff Triplette’s crew).

*Boston and Coleman are from Walt Anderson’s crew

Ben Austro
Ben Austro
Ben Austro is the editor and founder of Football Zebras and the author of So You Think You Know Football?: The Armchair Ref's Guide to the Official Rules (on sale now)

5 thoughts on “Live blog: Texans at Ravens

  1. There was an injury timeout for Ed Reed’s injury early in the game. Wasn’t he supposed to sit out the next play?

  2. @JHarry, that would be true if it was just an official timeout. The Ravens then had the option to take a team timeout, which they did. In that case, he can return on the play after the team time out.

  3. I have a question in regards to the Jacoby Muffed punt during todays game of the Texans vs. Ravens.

    After Jacoby Jones tried to catch the ball on the bounce, he muff the punt and then turns to run after the ball. One of the Ravens then tackles him from behind well after the ball is no longer touching Jacoby.

    Is it legal to tackle the returner that doesn’t have the ball but is trying to go after the ball. Seems like that should be some kind of holding?

    Anyboy have any insight?

  4. The Ravens defender gets the benefit of the doubt because Jacoby can be perceived as a ball carrier if the defender does not see the ball. Adding to the perception is that there is no whistle, so the Ravens #29 can easily assume that the play is alive. From our perspective we see the loose ball, but between #29 and the ball is Jacoby Jones.

    The same benefit of the doubt is given to a defensive back who hits a receiver who dropped a pass. If the defensive back is screened, or the receiver starts to move up field before securing the catch, the receiver can be hit without penalty (assuming that there is no other aspect of the play considered unnecessary roughness).

  5. In this game, the replay ref asked for a review on the spot of the ball in the 4th quarter under two minutes left. I really thought this was uncalled for as most spots of balls are arbitrary to begin with. Do you all think this was a bit excessive or completely called for? I don’t question the overturn….but I do question making the call to review to begin with.
    Also, in the history of the NFL review policies has this ever happened before? Has a replay official EVER asked for a review like this before? Is there a place to see a stat like this?
    Thanks for any reply you could help here.
    Ryan Parr

    Founder/CEO
    Fantazzle.com Fantasy Games

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