Football Zebras
AssignmentsWeek 13 referee assignments

Week 13 referee assignments

This Thanksgiving, catch Jerome Boger in Detroit before the family arrives, watch Bill Vinovich in Dallas while you enjoy your turkey, and then, whether you’re indulging in pumpkin pie or microwaving the lukewarm leftovers, flip over to NBC to see Shawn Smith in Atlanta. Shawn Hochuli is off this week.

Thursday, Nov. 28

  • Bears at Lions, 12:30 p.m.  FOX  —  Jerome Boger
  • Bills at Cowboys, 4:30 p.m.  CBS  —  Bill Vinovich
  • Saints at Falcons, 8:20 p.m.  NBC  —  Shawn Smith

Sunday, Dec. 1

  • Packers at Giants  —  Craig Wrolstad
  • Jets at Bengals  —  Ron Torbert
  • Raiders at Chiefs  —  John Hussey
  • Eagles at Dolphins  —  Adrian Hill
  • 49ers at Ravens  —  Brad Allen
  • Buccaneers at Jaguars  —  Walt Anderson
  • Titans at Colts  —  Carl Cheffers
  • Washington at Panthers  —  Scott Novak
  • Rams at Cardinals  —  Alex Kemp
  • Browns at Steelers  —  Clay Martin
  • Chargers at Broncos  —  Brad Rogers
  • Patriots at Texans  NBC  —  Tony Corrente

Monday, Dec. 2

  • Vikings at Seahawks  ESPN  —  Clete Blakeman
Cameron Filipe
Cameron Filipe
Cam Filipe is a junior at the University of New Haven, majoring in forensic science. He has been involved in football officiating for seven years and currently works as a flag football official in college. This is his fourth season covering NFL officiating for Fᴏᴏᴛʙᴀʟʟ Zᴇʙʀᴀs.

4 thoughts on “Week 13 referee assignments

  1. If a call is reviewed post game and decided by the league that a certain penalty should have not been called, does the referee crew get fined or penalized in any way?

    If not, they should. Handing fines for bad calls that can be reviewed during the games would make the NFL’s ratings go up.

  2. After every game, the tapes are reviewed and officials are graded on every play. When the NFL officiating brass spots an error the official receives a downgrade or “ding.” NFL playoff assignments are generally assigned based on regular season grades. I say generally because there are other intangible aspects that go into final ratings such as ability to keep a lid on tense situations. Also, it is not a straight ranked system where top 3 officials at each position work CC and Super Bowl, next 3 work Divisionals, and next 4 work Wild Card. Officials are grouped into tiers. Tier 1 are those who the NFL is comfortable working CC or Super Bowl. Tier 3 are the need improvement who NFL doesn’t want on the field at all for the playoffs. Tier 2 is everyone else. From Tier 1 officials, NFL likes to give Super Bowl assignments to the eligible official who has not worked the game in the longest time if ever. The one exception is that if an official ranks at the top of his/her position in consecutive years and did not work the Super Bowl after the first season of being ranked #1, he/she will automatically receive it the second year.

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